7 Activities to Improve the Attention Span of Your Children

Many children have short attention spans. Some people blame biology and disorders such as ADHD, while others blame the increasing intensity of the modern world and use of technology. Either way, parents should not worry if their child has a short attention span. In many cases, taking some time to work with your child can help improve, not just their attention, but other skills as well. Here are seven activities that may help.

 Puzzles

From wooden puzzles for toddlers to complicated word finds for older children, puzzles can help improve attention spans with added benefit of having fun. Puzzles require concentration to be completed and can be great individual activities, or they can be completed as a family or group. When purchasing or creating puzzles for your child, be sure you get one that is appropriate for your child’s age. If it’s too easy, your child will finish it quickly without using too much brainpower; if it’s too hard, your child will be come frustrated and be unable to complete it.

 Read a Book

Reading to your child from the time he or she is born has been found to have many benefits that will last a lifetime, but this activity can also help with short attention spans. If you read to your children, you can help keep them engaged by talking about the pictures, asking questions and discussing the plot and characters. You can ask your child what they think will happen at the end or what they would do if they were in a situation. This will usually encourage them to pay closer attention while you read, so they can find out what happens or if they were right about the ending.

 Scavenger Hunts

Scavenger hunts are a great way to increase a child’s attention span, because they require extra attention. They usually involve finding items that are not easily available, which means your child will need to concentrate on where to find an item and actually looking for it. Put together a list of common items found around your house, and offer a reward when your child finds one of everything on the list. Another great variation is to hide certain items and have your child find them.

 Play Outside

This one seems pretty simple, but in today’s world with our computers, DVDs, video games and cell phones, we tend to be captivated by technology. Take your kids to the local park and go for a nature walk. Talk about all of the things you see. Put together a picnic. Go to a local playground or even the backyard and have races or play games together. The key to this activity is leaving the technology at home.

 Memory Games

Remember the game Concentration? The name says it all. This game can be played with a simple deck of cards or you can make your own. Lay the cards face down, and take turns turning them over to find matches.

 Take Up a Craft

From sewing to painting, most crafts require time and concentration. Find one that your child is interested in and help him or her get started. Once they get the hang of it, pick out a slightly challenging project for them to complete.

 Play an Old-Fashioned Board Game

Today’s board games do everything from talk to light up, but the old games like Monopoly and Scrabble are about skill and concentration instead. Teach your child to play, and play as a family. You can even give them an incentive to win. These types of games can also teach skills such as counting and spelling.

Laine Kent is a mother who doubles as teacher for her four children. She realizes that her children need to be taken care of no matter what.  She also realizes the importance of a little self pampering. That is why she checks out flowerdelivery.net for a little splurge for herself.

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